Archive for the ‘Hands on Activities’ Category

Five Steps to Start School with a Bang!

Sunday, July 27th, 2014

Five Steps to Start School with a Bang! Slow, lazy mornings. Days full of sun, fun and laughter. Visiting friends and family. Trips nearby or far away, seeing and doing new things. Freedom from the usual routines and responsibilities. If you and yours enjoy summer as much as we do, it is impossible to just jump back into school mode without some kind of transition. After all, grumpy kids are no fun! Here are five ways to help turn your summer-loving children back into excited, optimistic students.

1. Be enthusiastic.

This seems obvious, but the wistful, melancholy comment about summer being almost over will come back to haunt you.  YOU set the emotional tone in your home. Your excitement for the upcoming school year will be contagious. 

2. Show your children the new curriculum in advance.

Discuss the plan of what you will be covering this year. Share the book list and show any crafts or projects you will be making. Let them browse through the upcoming materials and get a sneak peak of what is to come. Talk about how awesome the upcoming year will be!

3. Gear up together!

Everyone enjoys new school supplies. I love walking into Target this time of year and seeing all the new notebooks, folders, and pens, don’t you? It gets my blood flowing! Take your kids to your favorite school supply store and allow them to help select the new supplies. Who doesn’t enjoy new highlighters or pencil boxes? There is just something exciting about opening a clean, brand-spanking new notebook. If you sometimes do ‘school on the go’, thrill your kids with new lunch boxes or backpacks.

4. Create a Routine or Schedule.

Kids thrive with daily, weekly and monthly routines. Discuss the school day and how it will look this fall. Display a daily schedule for the whole family. For your littles, this is quite simple. You can draw pictures on a chart that lays out their day for them. This can include learning time, snack time, nap time and play time. Talk about the different activities or the structure of their day. For your older kids, buy or make a planner. Your high school students should learn to schedule their own work within your parameters. Hang a monthly calendar as well so Dad will know when and where you will be once school starts. Make sure to plug in all your regular activities and any outside classes or co-ops as well as field trips, church events, and service projects.

5. Adjust your sleep schedule.

This is usually the hardest battle. I recommend starting the sleep routine at least a week before you intend to start school. Have your kids begin the school bedtime and wake times in advance. This goes for you as well. When you wait to change bedtimes until the night before you intend to start school, it will make for a rough start to your day. Ease back into it! Just remember, if the new school year excites you, it will excite them, too! Do you have any particular things your family does to hit the ground running every year? Tell me in the comments!

Waking up those Brain Cells with Geography Activities

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

Wake up those Brain Cells with Geography Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you still enjoying a relaxing summer? Or with August just around the corner, are you already in the throes of preparing for the next school year?

Whether you are in relaxation mode or actively working on school prep, it doesn’t hurt to take advantage of learning opportunities to start waking up those sleepy brain cells!

Here are several easy-to-implement ideas to add geography study into your day from the comfort of your own home, or as you hit the road, board a plane or sail by sea:

 Maps

  • Start with the basic map facts like the title, compass rose and legend/key of a map.
  • Have your kids create a local map as you teach mapping basics. You can drive around your neighborhood or town as you teach. Kids can draw the streets and landmarks as you go.
  • Younger children can start with drawing a map of your home.
  • If traveling, have your students draw a map of your destination. Allow older kids to be the navigators.

 

State Studies

  • Check out some books from your local library on your state and create a state notebook.
  • Spend some time learning the state flag, flower, motto, and capital. Incorporate art into the lesson and allow the kids to draw or paint these items for your notebooks.
  • Spend some time researching your state’s history. Have your students dictate or write about what they have learned (and provide illustrations, of course).
  • Take a small road trip and visit your capital if you live close enough. Otherwise, find a local historical landmark to visit.

 

U.S. Geography

  • Simple and engaging for young elementary students, try the iTunes 99 cent app called “Stack the States,” available for iPhones and iPads.
  •  Allow your kids to familiarize themselves with the shape of each state and learn the capitals. Tracing and drawing states are especially great for young learners who need to work on fine motor skills.
  • Another hands on option is using the free online geography (and other) games at  sheppardsoftware.com.  In fact, you can learn world geography at this site as well!
  • Create your own United States puzzle by printing the map on cardstock. The kids can cut out the states, mix them up, and then put them back together again.

 

World Geography

  • For kids that love the movie Cars 2, take a large world map and lay it across the floor. Talk about the different countries each car is from and have the kids place the cars on the right spot on the map.
  • Kids can learn the continents and perhaps several different countries by just discussing your family tree. Do you have branches from England? Scotland? South Africa? China? Label them on a map: “Uncle George Born in Germany”
  • For the Lego lovers, build different monuments from around the world such as Stonehenge, Great Wall of China, Leaning Tower of Pisa, Eiffel Tower, or the Great Pyramid of Giza.
  • You can also visit restaurants from around the world in your home city then have your children find the country on the map.

 

Living Books

 You know this post would not be complete without a list of fantastic finds from the library or Amazon.com to resource your geographic explorations:

  • Children Just Like Me, Kindersley. With this book you can read each day about a new child then place a pin or thumb tack on the map where that child lives. This book is a great way to view what other children eat, what their homes look like, what types of toys they enjoy, and a little bit about their surroundings.
  • Maps and Globes. One of my favorite map/globe books for young children, this is a must-have. Enchantingly appealing illustrations show where to find the tallest mountain and the deepest ocean,  and covers the countries of the world as well as how to find your way around your own neighborhood.
  • DK First Atlas. Magnificent pictures entrance elementary readers while chock full of information about continents, countries, oceans, topography and more.
  • Geography Songs. This is out of print so check out your public library or grab this used on Amazon if you can. This is a fabulous memory aid to learning states and countries!
  • Ultimate Sticker Book: Flags of the World Especially helpful for your hands on learners, this is packed with 300 reusable stickers and has been updated as of 2012.

So are what are you up to at this point in your summer? Do you have everything together for the fall or are you lying on a beach? Or somewhere in between the two?  Tell me in the comments!

 

 

 

 

 

Mini Valentine’s Day Unit Study!

Monday, February 3rd, 2014
Valentine's Day Unit Study for homeschooled students

Here are 15 Valentine’s Day ideas, broken down by subject, to add some pizzazz to your homeschooling!

Valentine’s ideas for History and Geography

1.  Did you know the original St. Valentine was said to be a Christian martyr? Noting that there are a few different versions of the St. Valentine’s legend, have your middle/high schooler research and create a short oral report about St. Valentine’s life and death and present it to your family.

2. Have your dramatically-inclined student use the above research and create a short play based on St. Valentine’s life and perform it for another homeschooling family.
3. Task your students with researching Valentine’s Day during the Middle Ages and find out what Valentine’s Day had to do with birds.  :-)
4.  One of the most common symbols of Valentine’s Day is a Cupid. After defining  the word “symbol” for your youngest students, have your older ones research Cupid, draw a picture of one (in color, of course) and include a description of the origins of Cupid on the page.
5. Valentine’s Day is not just an American holiday! Have your student(s) locate other countries where Valentine’s Day is celebrated and do one or more of the following: Make a notebooking page for every country you find that celebrates Valentine’s Day.  List the Valentine’s Day traditions of that country and draw a map of each country.
6. Choose one or more interesting traditions and incorporate it into your family’s celebration.

7. Create a world map labeling the countries that celebrate Valentine’s Day.

Valentine’s Ideas for Language Arts

8. Create a word search including the following terms: Valentine’s Day, roses, pink, red, lace, cupid, card, St. Valentine, heart, doves, chocolate, etc.

9. What does the Bible say about love?  Instruct your students to find verses that describe the love that God has for His people, for the church and the love believers should have for one another.  Choose some of the verses as copy work and/or memorization.
10. Have your students define the word “love” in a paragraph.  Have them read about love in the Bible and the

n revise their paragraph as needed, including Bible verses as references.  Use this assignment as a lesson between love as a “feeling” and love as a “choice” and/or an “action.”

Valentine’s Ideas in Science

11. Use this week  as an opportunity for a quick scientific study of the heart. Write a short report about the function of the human heart.  Include a diagram of the heart, labeling the various parts. Using different colors, show the blood flow into and out of the heart.

12.  Make a poster  comparing and contrasting the human heart and the heart of an amphibian or reptile. If comparing and contrasting is a new concept you may want to use a Venn Diagram for help.

Valentine’s Ideas for Fun and Family Ministry

13. Gather your construction paper, wrapping paper scraps, ric rac, spare buttons, markers, glue and other craft supplies in the appropriate colors. Take an afternoon off school and construct hand-made Valentine’s cards for friends, family, elderly or shut in neighbors, children at a local hospital, etc.  Add a Bible verse about love to your cards and talk about what the verse means.

14.  Bake heart-shaped sugar cookies, frost with pink icing and glaze with pink sugar.  Include a homemade card and cookies and take to the neighbors, a nursing home or use to create a care package to a college student or two.
15. Start a new tradition!  Join with another family or two and assign many of the above ideas to different children.  Plan and execute a Valentine’s Party or dessert.  Have everyone share their reports and projects, exchange Valentines and then enjoy homemade Valentine’s treats!
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And let’s not leave out any of the youngest members of your family — here is an adorable interactive book that will make your babies giggle with glee.  (Really!)
What ideas can you add or what mentioned here sparked your interest?  What do you do at your house to celebrate Valentine’s Day?
Dana

 

Heart image courtesy of Zoo-fari via Wikimedia Commons

Martin Luther King Day!

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Ihaveadreambymichelle kwajafa via StockXChng (428x640)

 

 

 

“The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically. Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education.”

–Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

 “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

–Martin Luther King, from a  Letter from a Birmingham Jail

April 16, 1963

 

 

 

 

 

Resources for Studying Martin Luther King

Are you hustling to try and pull something together for Martin Luther King Day?  Here are a few ideas for you:

  1. Fellow homeschooling mother and friend Erica Johns of Classical Composers Monthly has put together a webpage  with some cool Martin Luther King resources, including a short biography, web clips and links to other information.
  2. After watching the clip from Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, have your younger students draw a picture of one of their “dreams” (i.e., how they would like the world to be).
  3.  Read and discuss the transcription of “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.”
  4. Read just a section of the letter and have your children narrate afterward.
  5. Have your older children read the letter and discuss or write about one or more of the following:
  • Based on his letter, what can you tell about Martin Luther King’s education?
  • Based on his letter, what can you tell about his values?
  • Choose a line or two up or more, depending upon the age of your students,  for copywork.

 

Additional Assignment Possibilities

  1. Research and write about the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.
  2. Make a lapbook about Martin Luther King’s life.
  3. Divide the following terms, events and people among your students. Give them time to research  and have them each report briefly on  each event or person at the end of the day:
                        • the 1963 March on Washington
                        • the Southern Christian Leadership Conference
                        • the Selma Voter-Registration Drive
                        • the the Voting Rights Act of 1965
                        • the Birmingham Protests of 1963
                        • the Black Panthers
                        • Eugene “Bull” O’Connor
                        • Coretta Scott King
                        • Mahatma Gandhi.

 Processing What Was Learned

After your students read and learned more about Dr. Martin Luther King, ask them:

  • Why do you think we celebrate Dr. King’s birthday?
  • What did he do that was important?
  • What could you do to help bring peace to the world? (Starting with your home or neighborhood…)

 Books about the Civil Rights Movement

 

What will you be doing for Martin Luther King Day?

Photo courtesy Michelle Kwajafa via StockxChng.com

Thanksgiving Activities for Kids!

Sunday, November 10th, 2013